Was the United States Founded on Christian Religion?

by P.A. Madison on December 16th, 2010

I’m often asked if the United States as a nation was founded upon Christianity and the answer is clearly no because religion was not an object of concern delegated to national government by the member States who formed it. National government was formed with very few and limited objects such as war, uniform bankruptcy laws, foreign commerce, etc. All other imaginable concerns dealing with everyday domestic affairs of the people remained with the people themselves within their individual and independent States.

A more accurate view would be current national government was formed by very Christian member States whose governments openly and freely observed Christian teachings and continued to do so afterwards.


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5 Responses | Leave a Comment
  1. oft says:

    Am I reaching too far claiming PA SC, and GA favored Christianity by using Christian terms?

  2. J. Aldridge says:

    I don’t think there is any question that the member states adhered to christianity in their laws – just look at them Sunday laws they had! As Madison rightfully points out, religion was not a national concern delegated and so remained with the states on a individual state level where it remains today whether the court likes it or not.

  3. oft says:

    Georgia Const. of 1789 favors Christianity as well:

    Section 18. No clergyman of any denomination shall be a member of the General Assembly.

    PA of 1790:

    3. That all men have a natural and indefeasible right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own consciences; that no man can, of right, be compelled to attend, erect or support any place of worship, or to maintain any ministry against his consent; that no human authority can, in any case whatever, control or interfere with the rights of conscience; and that no preference shall ever be given, by law, to any religious establishments or modes of worship.

    4. That no person who acknowledges the being of a God and a future state of rewards and punishments, shall, on account of his religious sentiments, be disqualified to hold any office or place of trust or profit under this commonwealth.

    Pennsylvania was Trinitarian in 1776 and still Christian. The word Ministry is strictly a Christian term:

    Webster’s 1828:

    2. Ecclesiastical function; agency or service of a minister of the gospel or clergyman in the modern church, or of priests, apostles and evangelists in the ancient. Acts 1. Rom.12. 2 Tim.4. Num.4.

  4. oft says:

    Just found this in South Carolina’s Constitution of 1790:

    “23. And whereas the ministers of the Gospel are, by their pro fession, dedicated to the service of God, and the care of souls, and ought not to be diverted from the great duty of their functions: therefore, no minister of the Gospel, or public preacher, of any religious persuasion, whilst he continues in the exercise of his pastoral functions, shall be eligible to the office of Governor, Lieutenant Governor, or a seat in the Senate or House of Representatives.”

    So this State endorsed Christianity by favoring ministers of the Gospel. I will check the others.

  5. oft says:

    A more accurate view would be current national government was formed by very Christian member States whose governments openly and freely observed Christian teachings and continued to do so afterwards.>>>>

    The vast majority of State Governments mandated Christianity. The others: PA, GA, RI, and SC mention God. Pennsylvania, Georgia, and South Carolina’s State Constitution’s of 1776 were Trinitarian. They didn’t change because their people became more Orthodox in the 1790′s.

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